Camera Thursdays Film Review: Impossible Project PX 100 Silver Shade UV+

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Normally on #camerathursdays we showcase a Blurb employee with the camera of their choice. However, we’ve kind of neglected the whole subject of film so far. So this week we’re taking some time out to review the Impossible Project’s PX 100 Silver Shade UV+.

If you don’t know about the Impossible Project, it is a consortium of mad photo scientists in the Netherlands looking to resurrect the classic Polaroid films. Polaroid, you see, pulled the plug on their instant films, leaving a lot of really great cameras with nothing to do.

I’d used the previous version of the Project’s PX 100 Silver Shade but with little luck. The images generally lacked definition, were incredibly sensitive to light while developing, and all had an yellow cast which ate away at detail. I threw away more pictures than I kept, which, at $25 for 8 photos, is a nasty proposition. You can see the examples below:

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The new PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ is a different animal altogether. The yellow cast is gone entirely. Instead, you get gorgeous silvery grays, and clean whites. The depth of field is also greatly improved along with the definition. Sure, the film is still susceptible to light leeks and exhibits irregularities with chemistry, but that’s sort of why you shoot with a Polaroid. Or at least why I do. From portraits to abstracts, it performed admirably. Here are the results:

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The same caveats apply: you should dial down to the darker setting (the instructions say 1/3 to 2/3, but going all the way is advisable in many situations) and cover the picture when it ejects (preferably with a light shield attached to the camera). And of course, keep it out of the light for four minutes or more during development. A labor of love? You bet. But finally, it’s worth the labor.

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2 Comments

  1. Love this film! I shot my entire 365 project using film from The Impossible Project and just released the 2011 book!

    http://www.blurb.com/my/book/detail/3094978

      March 31, 2012 – 11:38 pm   Permalink
  2. It’s great stuff. Love your project, by the way. It’s even today’s Staff pick.

    By Kent
      April 2, 2012 – 12:12 pm   Permalink

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